Author Faculty (Discipline)

Arts

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-28-2022

Journal

War in History

Volume Number

29

Issue Number

2

Page Numbers

385-405

ISSN

0968-3445

Embargo Period

5-11-2022

ANZSRC / FoR Code

4303 Historical studies

Avondale Research Centre

Scripture, Spirituality and Society Research Centre

Reportable Items (HERDC/ERA)

C1

Link to publisher version (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1177/09683445211002554

Peer Review

Before publication

Abstract

While the Australian Imperial Force of 1914–1918 experienced a significant shift from amateurism to professionalism over the course of the war in most areas, one crucial role not yet examined in the literature on the Australian Imperial Force is that of army cooks. This article argues that their role was not taken sufficiently seriously during the Great War, leaving them effectively still amateurs at the end of the war. It explores the regulations for army cooks, the processes of selection, training and monitoring, as well as their performance in camps and in the field, and draws the conclusion that the army failed to professionalize the role.

Comments

Used by permission: the author(s).

Staff and Students of Avondale University may access the full text of this article from Avondale library PRIMO search


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