Title

Increased Fluid Intake for the Prevention of Urinary Tract Infection in Adults and Children in all Settings: A Systematic Review

Author Faculty (Discipline)

Nursing

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2020

JOURNAL

Journal of Hospital Infection

VOLUME NUMBER

104

ISSUE NUMBER

1

PAGE NUMBERS

68-77

ISSN

0195-6701

ANZSRC / FoR Code

111001 Aged Care Nursing| 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)| 111716 Preventive Medicine

Avondale Research Centre

Lifestyle and Health Research Centre

Reportable Items

C2

Abstract

Background

Non-antibiotic interventions for urinary tract infection (UTI) prevention have been investigated as a strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing for UTI and subsequent antibiotic resistance. Increased hydration is widely advocated for preventing UTI; however, evidence for its effectiveness is unknown.

Aim

To systematically review the published literature on the effectiveness of increased fluid intake as a preventive intervention for UTI in adults and children in any setting.

Methods

Five electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2019 to identify published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies evaluating the effectiveness of high (≥1.5 L/24 h) versus normal/low (

Findings

Of the 2822 potentially relevant papers, two were eligible for inclusion: an RCT (individual randomization) and a cluster-RCT. Both studies differed regarding participants, setting, sample size, UTI definition, and intervention. The RCT was assessed as having a low risk of bias whereas the cluster-RCT had a high risk of bias. Only the RCT, which included healthy premenopausal women visiting primary care clinics, demonstrated statistical significance for the effect of high fluid intake for UTI prevention.

Conclusion

The lack of enough adequately powered and robust RCTs highlights the need for further research on the effectiveness of this intervention for UTI prevention.

Peer Review

Before publication

Comments

Due to copyright restrictions this article is unavailable for download.

© 2019 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Staff and Students of Avondale College may access this article from a Library PRIMO search here.

At the time of writing Brett Mitchell was affiliated with the University of Newcastle.

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