Title

Global Burden, Point Sources, and Outbreak Management of Healthcare-Associated Burkholderia Cepacia Infections: An Integrative Review

Author Faculty (Discipline)

Nursing

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2020

Early Online Version

5-22-2020

JOURNAL

Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology

VOLUME NUMBER

41

ISSUE NUMBER

7

PAGE NUMBERS

777-783

ISSN

1559-6834

Embargo Period

9-28-2020

ANZSRC / FoR Code

060502 Infectious Agents| 111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative)| 111706 Epidemiology| 111716 Preventive Medicine

Avondale Research Centre

Lifestyle and Health Research Centre

Reportable Items (HERDC/ERA)

C1

Abstract

Objective:

To examine the global burden, associated point sources, and successful prevention and control measures for documented outbreaks of Burkholderia cepacia healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).

Design:

Integrative review.

Methods:

A review of all outbreaks of Burkholderia cepacia HAIs published in the peer-reviewed literature between January 1970 and October 2019 was conducted to identify the global burden, associated point sources, and successful prevention and control measures using the Guidelines for Outbreak Reports and Intervention Studies of Nosocomial Infections (ORION).

Results:

In total, we reviewed 125 documented outbreaks of Burkholderia cepacia–related HAIs worldwide. The reported B. cepacia HAIs for this period involved 3,287 patients. The point sources were identified in most outbreaks of B. cepacia HAIs (n = 93; 74.4%); they included medication vials, disinfectants, and antiseptics. Moreover, 95 of the outbreak reports (76%) described effective prevention and control measures, but only 33 reports indicated the use of a combination of environment-, patient- and staff-related measures. None of the outbreak reports used the ORION guidelines.

Conclusions:

Outbreaks of Burkholderia cepacia HAIs are an ongoing challenge. They are often associated with immunocompromised patients who acquire the infection from exposure to contaminated medications, products, and equipment. These outbreaks are not infrequent, and a range of infection prevention and control measures have been effective in arresting spread. The use of ORION guidelines for outbreak reporting would improve the quality of information and data to generate evidence for translation into practice.

Link to publisher version (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.184

Peer Review

Before publication

Comments

Due to copyright restrictions this article is unavailable for download.

At the time of writing Philip Russo was affiliated with Avondale University College


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