Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-5-2019

JOURNAL

Case Reports and Literature Review

VOLUME NUMBER

3

ISSUE NUMBER

1

PAGE NUMBERS

100021

Embargo Period

1-12-2021

ANZSRC / FoR Code

1109 NEUROSCIENCES

ANZSRC / FoR Code

4206 Public health

Abstract

Neurological deterioration in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and resulting motor dysfunction arises from Lewy body formation and dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra. Two factors contributing to PD-related apoptosis and subsequent motor dysfunction involve improper cellular metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and impaired mitochondrial functionality. The co-factor Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+), reduction of which has been implicated in the development of neurodegenerative disease, is a critical player in maintaining cellular redox metabolism and mitochondrial function. We present a case study of a PD patient who has become near asymptomatic through the use of intravenous (I.V.) NAD+. This report documents the patient’s initial symptom changes while receiving I.V. NAD+ over the course of eight treatment days, with two non-treatment days in between. The treatment entailed 1500 mg. I.V. NAD+ on day one, 1000 mg. I.V. NAD+ on day two, and 750 mg. I.V. NAD+ on day three. Symptoms were documented by medical staff for the next two days of non-treatment. Following this, 750 mg. I.V. NAD+ was administered on treatment days four and five, 500 mg. I.V. NAD+ on treatment days six and seven, and 750 mg. I.V. NAD+ on treatment day eight. Over the course of treatment, the patient’s hand tremors decreased to a mild level, permitting coordinated use of a pen and utensils. Hand tremors were absent on days one and six. Visual hallucinations were absent on days two through seven. To maintain tremors at a tolerable level, aftercare involved I.V. NAD+ every four to six weeks, with a daily regimen of 300 mg/ml NAD+ nasal spray. Moreover, the patient discontinued PD-related medication, thereby preventing visual hallucination side effects. Although more research on NAD+ in clinical use is needed, the evidence obtained from these symptom improvements indicates NAD+ as having the potential for clinical use in at least a subset of PD sufferers.

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Comments

Used by permission: the author(s).

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


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