Author Faculty (Discipline)

Nursing

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2020

Early Online Version

7-29-2020

JOURNAL

American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

VOLUME NUMBER

14

ISSUE NUMBER

6

PAGE NUMBERS

606-611

ISSN

1559-8284

Embargo Period

3-16-2021

ANZSRC / FoR Code

420208 Nutritional epidemiology

Avondale Research Centre

Lifestyle and Health Research Centre

Reportable Items (HERDC/ERA)

C1

Abstract

Although childhood “picky eating” or “fussy eating” or “food neophobia” is well established as a subject of research, commentary, and treatment guidelines, there is very little published research exploring the origins and basis of adult food neophobia, much less its treatment. Existing treatment guidelines for picky eating tend to focus on cognitive behavioral interventions. The consequences of picky eating, although not extensively researched, include inadequate nutrition and weight management difficulties—both significant contributors to the worldwide disease burden. Health coaching has a focus on personal choice, reflection on previous successes and current strengths, as well as identification of a personal health vision and achievable goals. As such, it may play a useful role in supporting behavioral change in adult picky eaters. A structured intervention, rooted in health coaching skills and culinary medicine aimed at supporting such change, is proposed.

Link to publisher version (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827620943821

Peer Review

Before publication

Comments

Staff and Students of Avondale College may access the full text of this article from Avondale Library PRIMO search here


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