Author Faculty (Discipline)

Theology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2021

Journal

Colloquium: the Australian and New Zealand theological review

Volume Number

53

Issue Number

2

Page Numbers

7-28

ISSN

0588-3237

Embargo Period

5-1-2022

ANZSRC / FoR Code

5004 Religious studies| 5005 Theology

Avondale Research Centre

Scripture, Spirituality and Society Research Centre

Abstract

This postcolonial biblical critical analysis applies the constructs of mimicry and hybridity to analyse Revelation 1:1–6, 9:11, and 13:11. Certain symbols in Revelation 1:1–6 mimic Roman ideology in order to depict God as greater than Zeus. The passage subverts the social structures of the empire by identifying the audience as slaves and priests. The audience is invited to “hear” the book of Revelation since the concept of “seeing” enforces the empire’s values. Revelation 9:11 provides insight into how hybridity functions, while Revelation 13:11 provides an example of how mimicry and hybridity operate. John shrewdly mimics the dominant culture’s behaviour and values with the use of mimicry and hybridity by proposing that God’s empire subsumes the Roman Empire, based on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and that this godly empire is comprised of a new humanity of hearing slaves and priests (Rev 1:5–6).

Link to publisher version (DOI)

https://anzats.edu.au/journal/

Peer Review

Before publication

Comments

Used by permission: the author and the Australian and New Zealand Association of Theological Schools Ltd.


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