Date of Award

11-2007

Embargo Period

1-14-2018

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Teaching (Honours) BA/BTch (Hons)

Faculty

Education

School

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Cedric Greive

Second Advisor

Dr. John Watts

ANZSRC / FoR Code

130311 Pacific Peoples Education

Abstract

Seven Australian Samoan secondary students participated in a study of cultural variation, learning styles and pedagogy. The data were gathered through taped and transcribed interviews with the students and seven of their teachers. The study found that students identified themselves as both Samoans and Australians and prevailing circumstances determined their position on this Australian-Samoan dimension. The study further indicated several factors that enhanced or inhibited the students' learning. They saw themselves as citizens of the school community and were well integrated into the school culture and they generally valued their school experience and exhibited a positive attitude toward the school ethos. This was evident in the wide and various subjects they undertook and enjoyed. While they found some subjects difficult, they responded with effort. Teachers indicated that, along with other island students, the Samoan students had a level of English proficiency that was not strong enough to allow them to engage successfully with some upper secondary subjects. in addition, a number lacked the ability to be systematic and some expressed difficulty with those teaching styles that conflicted with their own learning styles. The study made a number of recommendations.

Comments

Used by permission: the author

© 2007 Alan A. Stephens

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